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Chinese New Year 

Chinese New Year is a time of celebration and renewal. It’s the perfect opportunity to reflect on your life, make resolutions for the year ahead, and give thanks for all that you have in your life. In Chinese culture, it’s a 16-day long festival and each day has an assigned meaning.

In comparison to Western calendars, which are based on the Gregorian calendar, the Chinese calendar is a lunar calendar. Famous for parades and stage performances, the festivities also include a lot of fun Chinese superstitions around fortunes for the coming year.


Craft Beautiful Chinese New Year Designs

Whether you're celebrating within the family unit or with friends, create personalized invitations or cards for your loved ones in Design Wizard. Or why not exchange your favorite Chinese New Year recipes and arrange the ingredients and instructions in a nice visual way.

Here's how to get started:

Step 1: Browse our library of Chinese New year templates. Save your favorites and open your chosen invitation or recipe template.

Step 2: Customize your invitation to add your personal style. Change colors to as many shades of red as you like and add some sparkle with firecracker icons. Adjust the text to give your friends all the details about your party or type up your favorite recipe for Nonya Hokkien Stir-Fried Noodles, sticky rice cake, spring rolls, or sweet rice balls.

Step 3: Save and download your invitation or recipe. Or select the option to share it directly to your social media feed to let your friends know about your plans for Chinese New Year.


How to Celebrate Chinese New Year 

Chinese families eat lucky foods and festive dishes like steamed fish, dumplings, noodles, and sweet treats at the family reunion dinner. All the meals have meanings. For example, Nian Gao, a glutinous rice cake stands for a higher income or a higher position in the new year.

Setting off firecrackers and the performance of the lion dance troupe is a long-standing tradition that is intended to ward off evil spirits like the Nian. The color red became a Chinese symbol because of the myth that Nian hated the color. He was also afraid of loud noises, which is probably where the idea for loud parades came from.  There's also the dragon dance and other cultural performances that happen around the world from Hong Kong to the Chinese Diaspora in San Francisco.